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Spring Clean Your Resume: 5 Items to Delete ASAP

CBS MoneyWatch

05.06.2013

By AMY LEVIN-EPSTEIN / MONEYWATCH/ May 6, 2013, 7:00 AM

(MoneyWatch) Your resume shouldn't be set in stone. Instead, it should be a fluid document that is tweaked each and every time you send it to a new employer. Here are five things to delete from your resume:

Outdated or obvious tech skills. "Proficient in Microsoft Word" has no place on a resume, said Brad Karsh, president of JB Training Solutions. "It is 2013. If you compiled your resume you obviously know how to use Microsoft Word," says Karsh. "Do not waste space on your resume to showcase that you know how to use everyday workplace tools such as Microsoft Office, Google, or Facebook."

Inside industry speak. You don't know who will be vetting your resume. Sometimes, it will be a recruiter who is not familiar with industry terms. Other times, it will go straight to the hiring manager, who will know lingo associated with the job. Err on the side of caution and write your resume so anyone can understand it. "Use 'plain English' and avoid industry jargon or technical phrases," says Ford Myers, "Get The Job You Want, Even When No One's Hiring."

Fancy formatting. The content should catch the eye of the reader -- not weird typefaces or formatting. "Keep the layout simple and clean -- almost boring," suggests Myers. The one exception? If you're applying to be a graphic designer, there may be a little more leeway. But whatever type of job you're going for, aim to keep the format consistent and easy to read, says Myers.

Certain personal information. With identity theft a prevalent problem these days, things like your date of birth and social security number should be left off your resume, notes Louise Kusmarck, resume expert and founder of career consulting firm Best Impression Career Services, Inc. This is especially important when you're putting your resume into an online database that may be susceptible to hacking.

Obscure awards. If you want to mention an industry or academic award that's not widely known, take a line or two to describe what the award signifies, suggests Karsh: "Otherwise, take it off of your resume."

 

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